German Shepherd Curly Tail Problems

German Shepherd Curly Tail Problems

If you own a German Shepherd, then you know that they can be extremely expressive through their body language. Body language is quite obvious; a tail wagging like crazy, accompanied by exciting licks, is a good indication that your dog is thrilled.

A German Shepherd wagging its tail is saying something. It is their way of communicating. The way they position their tail and move it means something that only their owners and other dog owners understand.

But what if they have tail problems? There are three known GSD tail problems, and these are mostly genetically predisposed. They are at risk of developing anal furunculosis, skin disease, and limber tail syndrome. These conditions can be restricted by securing that you are breeding GSDs that are free from these diseases genetically.

German Shepherd  Curly Tail Language

When a German Shepherd moves, it conveys their feelings. Here’s what a GSD’s tail movements and positions mean.

German Shepherd  Curly Tail Language

Wagging Tail

When a German Shepherd is wagging its tail more to the left, it means they are feeling negative emotions such as being nervous. German Shepherd wagging its tail more to the right, it means they are feeling positive emotions such as being excited or happy for seeing you or when playing with you.

A GSD is wagging its tail widely on both sides, it means they are delighted. When a GSD is wagging its tail slowly on both sides, it means it is being confused .notice this if you are giving your GSD a training.

Low Hanging Tail

When a German Shepherd Dog has his tail hanging low, this is a good indicator that he is feeling relaxed. You will notice in such a case that your dog’s overall demeanor will also be generally relaxed. 

With a GSD, a low hanging tail doesn’t necessarily mean that it will be hanging straight down. Looking at the base of the tail is helpful here to differentiate between a slightly tucked tail and a low-hanging tail.

If it is slightly tucked, then there will be more of an immediate downward slope from the base, vs. a low-hanging tail, which will be indicated by a more gradual or straight line from the bottom of the tail.

High Position

A German Shepherd who’s tail is positioned up high can mean a few different things. Now it all depends on you how you judge your pet.

  1. Aggression
  2. Arousal
  3. Eagerness to play
  4. Eagerness to breed

Regardless of the reason that your GSD may be holding his tail in a high position, you can be sure that it is a sign of some type of interest. If there are other male dogs present, then be on the lookout for aggression or play. And if there are other female dogs current, then it is more likely that your GSD is indicating that he is aroused and perhaps eager to breed.

Tail That Suddenly Stops Wagging

If your German Shepherd was wagging his tail and then suddenly stops, then it’s time to pay close attention. This behavior is a sure sign that there has been a sudden change within your dog’s emotions. 

The change could just be as easy as something stimulating his curiosity – perhaps a squirrel he noticed outside of the window. However, a tail that suddenly stops wagging can also indicate a potentially dangerous situation, especially if the German Shepherd in question is interacting with someone individually.

Middle Positioned Tail

A middle-positioned tail can be ambiguity for a German Shepherd. It can mean mostly the same things as a high-positioned tail fear, arousal, aggression, play. Here, the surrounding context is often the only way to tell precisely what is going on with a German Shepherd internally.

A tail in this position is often a suggestion that the dog is in-between states, and just isn’t as of yet showing how he will be acknowledged to a situation. So again, it’s essential to look at the big picture, as this can be a sign that a GSD is just assessing a job and hasn’t yet committed to a response.

Is Obsessive Tail Chasing Bad for Your German Shepherd?

Do you love seeing your GSD pup chasing its tail? They love enjoying round and round, trying to pursue their tail, and when they catch it, they produce that low growling sound. 

Is Obsessive Tail Chasing Bad for Your German Shepherd?

It means they won. No matter how fun it is watching your pup chasing its tail, the act itself says something about your pet. You will see your GSD catching its tail when it finds itself in a small enclosure.

When a GSD is placed in a cramped space, it becomes anxious. Hence it catches its tail. You will see your GSD catching its tail when it is annoying. If you haven’t been out with your dog for a day or two, it might need physical activity and catching its tail is the best activity it might find When your GSD is bored or anxious, they will end up chasing their tails obsessively until they hurt themselves.

Other Health Concerns for a German Shepherd

German Shepherds are also prone to developing other hereditary conditions according to research. Among the distinct medical conditions that you can expect from a GSD are.

Perianal Fistula

Considered as the Crohn’s disease of dogs, this condition affects the anus of the affected dog. It can lead to complications defecating, having bloody stool, and itchiness in the surrounding area of the anus.

Megaesophagus

When your GSD starts throwing up, especially after eating, it can be a sign of megaesophagus. This condition affects the esophagus, causing it to be limp and unable to pass digested food. It can also cause regurgitation. A GSD with megaesophagus is often given a soft or liquid diet. Treatment is lifelong.

Dog Bites

This condition affects the anus of the affected dog. It can lead to difficulties defecating, having bloody stool, and itchiness in the surrounding area of the anus.

Hip Dysplasia

This is the most common inherited medical concern for German Shepherd. As a large dog, their socket joints are at risk of being malformed. A GSD with hip dysplasia requires lifelong treatment.

Fleas

Fleas itself is not a medical concern, but the effect of having insects is. It can cause skin infection. A German Shepherd with fleas often suffers skin irritation that leads to anger, inflammation, and skin infection.

Tail Wagging Related Injuries

German Shepherds are known for wagging their curly tails all the time. Sometimes, too much passion can lead to injuries such as rattling their tails to furniture or the wall. Tail-wagging accidents can lead to fractured tailbone or cuts and bruises.

Degenerative Myelopathy

German Shepherds grow older; they also tend to extend age-related conditions such as Degenerative Myelopathy. This form affects the spinal cord tissue leading to weaker limbs that can end with paralysis or death.

German Shepherd’s Tail Problem Treatments

As a dog parent, you should watch your pet closely. At the first sign of tail problems such as cuts or excessive hair fall, check with your doctor immediately. 

If you notice that your dog is biting and trying to scratch it anus consistently, don’t hesitate to check for skin infection or irritation. Make it a part of your dog’s regular grooming habit. Check its body parts for possible signs of disease or medical condition. Check its head, its toes, and its tail. Thoroughly check its coat and make sure that no fleas are hiding underneath it.

Is Curl Tail Bad for Your German Shepherd?

Having a curled tail is not bad for German Shepherds. It is a genetic fault that affected some GSDs. Curled tail is also related to as ‘gay tail’. This genetic fault can’t be fixed.

Is Curl Tail Bad for Your German Shepherd

Having a gay tail doesn’t affect the health of your German Shepherd. However, some owners prefer a GSD with a straight tail. A straight tail projects a strong and powerful look that German Shepherds are known for. 

For this reason, owners of GSDs with gay tail often opt for surgical remedy. Having your GSD support a surgery to straighten up a curled tail is not a permanent solution. Because it is inherited, puppies of a GSD with a gay tail will also have a gay tail even after surgery.

Common Tail Problems Among German Shepherds

Limber Tail Syndrome

Limber Tail Syndrome is also referred to as a cold or broken tail syndrome. When a GSD spends too much time in cold water, it can damage its tail muscles. The symptoms of Limber Tail Syndrome are swollen tail muscle, having cramps, and having a painful tail. This condition heals after days, but if it is causing too much pain, you can ask your vet for a pain reliever.

Anal Furunculosis

Anal Furunculosis is a hereditary condition common among German Shepherds. It is a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin that starts under their tail and around their anus. This problem begins when the immune system of the GSD fails to respond suitably. The best way to avoid having a GSD with this hereditary disease is to ensure that your pup comes from GSD parents that are free of Anal Furunculosis genetically.

Anal Furunculosis

Anal Furunculosis is a hereditary condition common among German Shepherds. It is a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin that starts under their tail and around their anus. This problem begins when the immune system of the GSD fails to respond suitably. The best way to avoid having a GSD with this hereditary disease is to ensure that your pup comes from GSD parents that are free of Anal Furunculosis genetically.

Final Words

Remember that all German Shepherd behavior is on a spectrum. There is no definite point that can be ascribed to anyone’s behavior. Use your experience with your particular dog to evaluate just where on the frequency of any given action that your dog is situated. An excellent reference guide is put out by the British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

While it contains no exact thresholds, as these are impossible to discern when speaking about any breed in general terms, it is a very accurate visual representation of behavior escalation in German Shepherds. Remember that when evaluating your German Shepherd’s body language always to observe whether they are in combination with other signals as well. Use your understanding to better communicate with your German Shepherd, and to know when to exercise caution around others.

German Shepherds’ tails are as essential as their other body parts. It serves as a tool of communication to their owners, helps stabilize them in water, and balances them when walking. Owners may encounter some German Shepherd tail problems, some may be genetic and some may be acquired. Regular visits to the vet will ensure GSD tail health in check.

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